Fewer than 300 of their domestic counterparts, commonly called New Guinean singing dogs, are held in captivity across the globe, and their numbers … African wild dogs are becoming extinct for a number of reasons. In fact, it seems that the closest wolf ancestors of today's dogs may have gone extinct, leaving no wild descendants. The dog received its unusual name because of its high-pitched barking sounds and howls that has been described as a “wolf howl … This extinct dog breed gets its name because of the bluish tinge it had on its coat, and from the sailor John Paul Jones who is believed to have brought it to Scotland. This could mean good … In the mid-1800s, these dogs participated regularly in the erstwhile sport of dog fighting. T he distinct, mournful howl of a highland wild dog was once a mainstay in Papua, but for the past 50 years, scientists had considered them extinct in the wild. The New Guinea singing dog was thought to have been extinct in the wild for the past 50 years. Researchers studying a species of wild dog have discovered that it closely matches the DNA of a species thought to be extinct. At the same time, in the wild, some species like the African wild dog face the verge of extinction because of a high incidence of deadly diseases, habitat loss, struggling to find food etc. They have a lot of competition with other animals like lions and hyenas, so searching for food can be a struggle. The only remaining members of the canine species were the ones that were taken care of in captivity. So they hunt livestock and this causes farmers and ranchers to deliberately kill the wild dog. Despite anecdotal reports and unconfirmed photographs in recent years, many feared the New Guinea highland wild dog had become extinct through loss of habitat and mixing with feral village dogs. A rare dog breed that was thought to be extinct in the wild for the last 50 years could actually be thriving. The New Guinea singing dog was said to only exist in captivity, but a DNA analysis found its predecessor, the Highland Wild Dog, is thriving in Indonesia after being believed to be extinct. After decades of fearing that the New Guinea highland wild dog had gone extinct in its native habitat, researchers have finally confirmed the existence of a healthy, viable population, hidden in one of the most remote and inhospitable regions on Earth. It had a muscular and powerful build, and was a strong and ruthless fighting dog. Watch: Ancient Wild Dog Population Feared Extinct, Now Captured on Camera Unseen for more than 50 years, the New Guinea highland wild dog has at last been confirmed in its natural island habitat. List of the Extinct Dog Breeds